The Role Of Fixation In Visual Motion Analysis (bibtex)
by Cornelia Fermueller, Yiannis Aloimonos
Abstract:
The human eye is different from existing electronic cameras because it is not equipped with a uniform resolution over the whole visual field. With a small fovea in a large visual field it is not surprising that the human visual system has developed mechanisms, usually called saccades or pursuits, for moving the fovea rapidly. How does this particular ability of humans and primates to fixate on environmental points in the presence of relative motion help their visual systems in performing various tasks? To state the question in a more formal setting, we investigate in this paper the following problem: Suppose that we have an anthropomorphic active vision system, that is, a pair of cameras resting on a platform and controlled through motors by a computer that has access to the images sensed by the cameras in real time. If this machine can fixate on targets that are in motion relative to it, can it perform visual tasks in an efficient and robust manner? By restricting our attention to a set of navigational tasks, we find that such an active observer can solve the problems of 3-D motion estimation, egomotion recovery and estimation of time to contact in a very efficient manner. The possibility that a machine possessing gaze control capabilities can successfully address other problems, such as figure-ground segmentation, stereo-fusion, visual servoing for manipulatory tasks and relative depth.
Reference:
The Role Of Fixation In Visual Motion Analysis (Cornelia Fermueller, Yiannis Aloimonos), Technical report, PRIP, TU Wien, 1993.
Bibtex Entry:
@TechReport{PTR-Ferm93a,
  author =	 "Cornelia Fermueller and Yiannis Aloimonos",
  institution =	 "PRIP, TU Wien",
  number =	 "PRIP-TR-019",
  title =	 "The {R}ole Of {F}ixation In {V}isual {M}otion
                  {A}nalysis",
  year =	 "1993",
  url =		 "ftp://ftp.prip.tuwien.ac.at/pub/publications/trs/tr19.ps.gz",
  abstract =	 "The human eye is different from existing electronic
                  cameras because it is not equipped with a uniform
                  resolution over the whole visual field. With a small
                  fovea in a large visual field it is not surprising
                  that the human visual system has developed
                  mechanisms, usually called saccades or pursuits, for
                  moving the fovea rapidly. How does this particular
                  ability of humans and primates to fixate on
                  environmental points in the presence of relative
                  motion help their visual systems in performing
                  various tasks? To state the question in a more
                  formal setting, we investigate in this paper the
                  following problem: Suppose that we have an
                  anthropomorphic active vision system, that is, a
                  pair of cameras resting on a platform and controlled
                  through motors by a computer that has access to the
                  images sensed by the cameras in real time. If this
                  machine can fixate on targets that are in motion
                  relative to it, can it perform visual tasks in an
                  efficient and robust manner? By restricting our
                  attention to a set of navigational tasks, we find
                  that such an active observer can solve the problems
                  of 3-D motion estimation, egomotion recovery and
                  estimation of time to contact in a very efficient
                  manner. The possibility that a machine possessing
                  gaze control capabilities can successfully address
                  other problems, such as figure-ground segmentation,
                  stereo-fusion, visual servoing for manipulatory
                  tasks and relative depth.",
}
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