3D Mosaicing of Fractured Surfaces (bibtex)
by Martin Kampel
Abstract:
A major obstacle to the wider use of 3D object reconstruction and modeling is the extent of manual intervention needed. Such interventions are currently massive and exist throughout every phase of a 3D reconstruction project: collection of images, image management, establishment of sensor position and image orientation, extracting the geometric detail describing an object, merging geometric, texture and semantic data. This work aims to develop a solution for automated documentation of archaeological pottery, which also leads to a more complete 3D model out of multiple fragments. Generally the 3D reconstruction of arbitrary objects from their fragments can be regarded as a 3D puzzle. In order to solve it we identified the following main tasks: 3D data acquisition, orientation of the object, classification of the object and reconstruction. 3D acquisition with respect to archaeological requirements is described by four different methods, designed for the recording of fragments, complete vessels, profile sections and color. The range and pictorial information of the objects is the input for further classification and reconstruction. In the so-called documentation step the processing of the recorded data leads to orientation and the profile sections. The following classification step produces a systematic view and order of the material recorded and identifies possible candidates for subsequent fragment assembling. Reconstruction of pottery refers not only to the reconstruction of a pot from its fragments, but also to the reconstruction of a pot or fragment out of its profile section. This thesis describes a complete system for automated documentation and reconstruction of archaeological pottery. The main contributions are 3D scanning of pottery, pairwise registration of views, a scheme for automatic classification of pottery, and an approach for solving 3D jigsaw puzzles of fragmented surfaces. In order to evaluate the system, experiments and results are given on both synthetic and real data. The selected approaches are cross-checked with the associated archaeologists.
Reference:
3D Mosaicing of Fractured Surfaces (Martin Kampel), Technical report, PRIP, TU Wien, 2003.
Bibtex Entry:
@TechReport{TR086,
  author =	 "Martin Kampel",
  title =	 "3{D} {M}osaicing of {F}ractured {S}urfaces",
  institution =	 "PRIP, TU Wien",
  number =	 "PRIP-TR-086",
  year =	 "2003",
  url =		 "ftp://ftp.prip.tuwien.ac.at/pub/publications/trs/tr86.pdf",
  abstract =	 "A major obstacle to the wider use of 3D object
                  reconstruction and modeling is the extent of manual
                  intervention needed. Such interventions are
                  currently massive and exist throughout every phase
                  of a 3D reconstruction project: collection of
                  images, image management, establishment of sensor
                  position and image orientation, extracting the
                  geometric detail describing an object, merging
                  geometric, texture and semantic data. This work aims
                  to develop a solution for automated documentation of
                  archaeological pottery, which also leads to a more
                  complete 3D model out of multiple
                  fragments. Generally the 3D reconstruction of
                  arbitrary objects from their fragments can be
                  regarded as a 3D puzzle. In order to solve it we
                  identified the following main tasks: 3D data
                  acquisition, orientation of the object,
                  classification of the object and reconstruction. 3D
                  acquisition with respect to archaeological
                  requirements is described by four different methods,
                  designed for the recording of fragments, complete
                  vessels, profile sections and color. The range and
                  pictorial information of the objects is the input
                  for further classification and reconstruction. In
                  the so-called documentation step the processing of
                  the recorded data leads to orientation and the
                  profile sections. The following classification step
                  produces a systematic view and order of the material
                  recorded and identifies possible candidates for
                  subsequent fragment assembling. Reconstruction of
                  pottery refers not only to the reconstruction of a
                  pot from its fragments, but also to the
                  reconstruction of a pot or fragment out of its
                  profile section. This thesis describes a complete
                  system for automated documentation and
                  reconstruction of archaeological pottery. The main
                  contributions are 3D scanning of pottery, pairwise
                  registration of views, a scheme for automatic
                  classification of pottery, and an approach for
                  solving 3D jigsaw puzzles of fragmented surfaces. In
                  order to evaluate the system, experiments and
                  results are given on both synthetic and real
                  data. The selected approaches are cross-checked with
                  the associated archaeologists.",
}
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