A Highly Adaptable Concept for Visual Inspection (bibtex)
by Robert Sablatnig
Abstract:
To be acceptable in industry, vision systems must be inexpensive, within the speed of the production-line flow, and very accurate. While visual inspection is high in potential, at present the design and implementation of automatic visual inspection systems is labor-intensive. In addition, most of the visual inspection systems are developed in isolation with no systematic approach. Increasing flexibility to allow the inspection of parts whose positions are less constrained is desirable. \\ This work aims to show a systematic automated visual inspection concept that separates the detection of primitives from the model-based analysis process. This separation is obtained by defining a general analysis graph for inspection, containing detail relations that represent detection algorithms. Together with an object-specific description, defined in a socalled description language, the analysis graph is instantiated. Existing pattern recognition software is re-used in the detection stage and therefore the use of any detection algorithm is possible without changing the analysis. The concept can be seen as a ``recipe'' for solving industrial applications, stating which kind of decision have to be made at which stage. \\ An industrial application of the concept, for which industrial constraints have to be considered, is shown in the example of an automated visual inspection system for analogue watermeters used for calibration. Results concerning time, accuracy, and reliability of the specific inspection task are given. The flexibility of the concept is demonstrated by testing the analysis process with the description of other instruments (a hygrometer and a clock), which is performed by adapting the analysis graph but without changing the detection algorithms.
Reference:
A Highly Adaptable Concept for Visual Inspection (Robert Sablatnig), Technical report, PRIP, TU Wien, 1997.
Bibtex Entry:
@TechReport{TR046,
  author =	 "Robert Sablatnig",
  institution =	 "PRIP, TU Wien",
  number =	 "PRIP-TR-046",
  title =	 "A Highly {A}daptable {C}oncept for {V}isual
                  {I}nspection",
  year =	 "1997",
  url =		 "ftp://ftp.prip.tuwien.ac.at/pub/publications/trs/tr46.ps.gz",
  abstract =	 "To be acceptable in industry, vision systems must be
                  inexpensive, within the speed of the production-line
                  flow, and very accurate. While visual inspection is
                  high in potential, at present the design and
                  implementation of automatic visual inspection
                  systems is labor-intensive. In addition, most of the
                  visual inspection systems are developed in isolation
                  with no systematic approach. Increasing flexibility
                  to allow the inspection of parts whose positions are
                  less constrained is desirable. \\ This work aims to
                  show a systematic automated visual inspection
                  concept that separates the detection of primitives
                  from the model-based analysis process. This
                  separation is obtained by defining a general
                  analysis graph for inspection, containing detail
                  relations that represent detection
                  algorithms. Together with an object-specific
                  description, defined in a socalled description
                  language, the analysis graph is
                  instantiated. Existing pattern recognition software
                  is re-used in the detection stage and therefore the
                  use of any detection algorithm is possible without
                  changing the analysis. The concept can be seen as a
                  ``recipe'' for solving industrial applications,
                  stating which kind of decision have to be made at
                  which stage. \\ An industrial application of the
                  concept, for which industrial constraints have to be
                  considered, is shown in the example of an automated
                  visual inspection system for analogue watermeters
                  used for calibration. Results concerning time,
                  accuracy, and reliability of the specific inspection
                  task are given. The flexibility of the concept is
                  demonstrated by testing the analysis process with
                  the description of other instruments (a hygrometer
                  and a clock), which is performed by adapting the
                  analysis graph but without changing the detection
                  algorithms.",
}
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